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ORIGINAL ARTICLE
Year : 2019  |  Volume : 6  |  Issue : 4  |  Page : 429-432

Serum amyloid A versus C-reactive protein in sepsis: new insights in an Egyptian ICU


1 Department of Pediatrics, Intensive Care and Pain Management, Faculty of Medicine, Mansoura University, Mansoura, Egypt
2 Department of Medical Microbiology and Immunology, Intensive Care and Pain Management, Faculty of Medicine, Mansoura University, Mansoura, Egypt
3 Department of Anesthesia, Intensive Care and Pain Management, Faculty of Medicine, Mansoura University, Mansoura, Egypt

Correspondence Address:
MD Nevert A Abdel Ghaffar
Department of Anesthesia, Intensive Care and Pain Management, Faculty of Medicine, Mansoura University, 35516 Mansoura
Egypt
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Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


DOI: 10.4103/roaic.roaic_58_19

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Background Early diagnosis of sepsis is a challenge. Several biomarkers are available for early diagnosis of sepsis. Serum amyloid A (SAA) and C-reactive protein (CRP) are examples of sepsis biomarkers. Settings and design We conducted a cohort study in a university-affiliated ICU in Mansoura, Egypt during the period from May 2018 to May 2019, including 50 children with sepsis. Patients and methods We subjected all patients to full history taking and clinical examination for age, sex, pediatric risk of mortality (PRISM) III and predicted death rate, symptoms and signs of sepsis, length of ICU stay, and invasive procedures. All patients were subjected to complete blood count, CRP, blood culture, and SAA level assay. Statistical analysis We used Student t-test, χ2, and Mann–Whitney tests. Results Twenty-three (46%) sepsis cases survived, whereas 27 (54%) cases died. SAA was more sensitive and specific than CRP in sepsis detection in children (sensitivity of 74.1 vs. 66.7% and specificity of 69.6 vs. 56.5%, respectively). Higher levels of SAA and CRP were observed in nonsurvivors when compared with survivors (P<0.001and 0.01, respectively). Conclusion SAA is a more sensitive and specific sepsis biochemical marker than CRP among critically ill children. Combined usage of SAA and CRP is helpful in predicting sepsis-related mortality.


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