• Users Online: 110
  • Home
  • Print this page
  • Email this page
Home About us Editorial board Ahead of print Current issue Search Archives Submit article Instructions Subscribe Contacts Login 
ORIGINAL ARTICLE
Year : 2015  |  Volume : 2  |  Issue : 2  |  Page : 1-6

Comparison of dexmedetomidine, lidocaine, and their combination in attenuation of cardiovascular and catecholamine responses to tracheal extubation and anesthesia emergence in hypertensive patients


Department of Anaesthesia and Intensive Care, Faculty of Medicine, Menoufiya University, Menoufiya, Egypt

Correspondence Address:
Hala M Koptan
Departement of Anesthesia and Intensive Care, Menoufiya University, Menoufia
Egypt
Login to access the Email id

Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


DOI: 10.4103/2356-9115.161307

Rights and Permissions

Introduction This study was carried out to compare the effi cacy of the dexmedetomidine– lidocaine combination with each drug alone in suppressing the hemodynamic and catecholamine stress responses during tracheal extubation and emergence from general anesthesia. Patients and methods Sixty hypertensive patients (ASA II– III), defi ned as systolic blood pressure more than 160 mmHg and/or diastolic blood pressure more than 95 mmHg, undergoing elective surgery were assigned to a randomized, double-blind approach and were divided into three equal groups: group D received 0.25 mg/kg dexmedetomidine intravenously, group L received 1.0 mg/kg lidocaine intravenously, and group DL received dexmedetomidine plus lidocaine at the same doses intravenously 2 min before tracheal extubation. Changes in heart rate, mean arterial pressure, rate– pressure product, and plasma catecholamine levels were measured before and after tracheal extubation. Results It was found that heart rate, mean arterial pressure, and rate– pressure product following tracheal extubation were lower in patients receiving the dexmedetomidine– lidocaine combination than in those receiving dexmedetomidine or lidocaine as a sole drug. In addition, catecholamine concentrations increased significantly after extubation (P < 0.05) in the three groups, with no signifi cant difference between them. Also, the tracheal extubation score was lower in groups L and DL compared with group D. Conclusion Although dexmedetomidine, lidocaine, or their combination failed to suppress the catecholamine responses to tracheal extubation and emergence from anesthesia, the dexmedetomidine– lidocaine combination was superior to each drug alone in attenuating the cardiovascular changes in hypertensive patients.


[FULL TEXT] [PDF]*
Print this article     Email this article
 Next article
 Previous article
 Table of Contents

 Similar in PUBMED
   Search Pubmed for
   Search in Google Scholar for
 Related articles
 Citation Manager
 Access Statistics
 Reader Comments
 Email Alert *
 Add to My List *
 * Requires registration (Free)
 

 Article Access Statistics
    Viewed678    
    Printed15    
    Emailed0    
    PDF Downloaded123    
    Comments [Add]    

Recommend this journal